Quad Twist thrill ride now available

QuadTwist_512Quad Twist – This classic amusement park attraction is inspired by “Scrambler” and “Sizzler” attractions built from both prims and mesh objects with seating for 16 avatars. Once all avatars are seated visitors can cick the attraction which will begin spinning each of the four groups of four seats at high speeds. All prims and mesh are YesMod, YesCopy, NoTransfer allows the attraction owner to recolor and retexture at will while all scripts are NoMod, YesCopy, NoTransfer.

https://marketplace.secondlife.com/p/QuadTwist-0215-High-Speed-Spinning-Thrill-Ride/6053041

http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Tustin/50/150/22

 

 

Vehicle Move System V2 is now available

z1225_VehicleMoveSystem2_512The movement of prims within a virtual world is appropriate in many situations such as for show (i.e. parades) or as a form of transportation (i.e. trains) as well as entertaining avatars (i.e. amusement rides). Vehicle-Move System from Kerhop’s Innovations allows you to specify a starting location, smooth travel along a path, and the ending location of a prim with minimal editing of a notecard all without causing sim lag due to physics. Working examples of a parade, train, and amusement ride are all included for your review in preparation for your own creations. Now, with version two you can also create and sell your own attractions! All scripts are no-modify, but they are yes-copy/yes-trans (with restrictions).

What’s New in Version 2.0
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1)  Create and Sell your own parades, transportation systems, or amusement rides.  2) Improved optimization of scripts means there is now minimal delay in between segments.  3) Enforces via script that creator of vehicle must be same avatar as movement programmer.  4) Removed implementation of showstartcircuit(), showfactorvars(), and showcurrentposrot()

SL Marketplace

 

Take One Moment to Consider Perceived Quality

parcelsettingsThe perception of how much effort is used to create a quality store environment can affect whether prospective visitors turn into a paying customer or whether they teleport away never to be seen again. Three of the factors that may apply to store quality include the arrangement of prims (i.e. textures, sizes, and organization) in the store, information visible on signs (i.e. pop-up notices and store policies), as well as parcel settings (i.e. name, media, restrictions).

The arrangement of prims can set the tone of the store depending on whether they appear to be rezzed in an organized fashion or scattered around the store at odd angles. Textures used in the store should be something other than the default of plywood and plain at a high enough resolution to show details, but not so high that it takes a long time for the texture to come into view. Alpha textures can be viewed from all angles to ensure there are no glitches and non-alpha textures at the same level overlap with each other resulting in the viewer randomly toggling between the two (sometimes referred to as flickering).

The purpose of signs in a store is to be informational without being too intrusive meaning landmarks and notecards are to be offered to the visitor only once, not every time they happen to walk into the sensor area. Store policies such as return, custom orders, post-sale support, and gifting options need to be clearly visible and available. Finally, any vendors that dispense a product needs to include not only the price of the item, but also the number of prims required and permissions allowed.

Parcel settings can either enhance the shopping experience or hinder it. For example, if the parcel is set to no-scripts then the chances of lag affecting avatars is minimized, but setting no-scripts might also disallow visitors from using their favorite HUD. Media settings such as music and sounds cannot conflict with each other, if there are sounds that you want the visitor to hear then a music stream playing at the same time may result in them not hearing the intended sound. Finally, the name of the parcel and description should be informative enough so that if the visitor decides to create their own landmark (rather than accepting yours) it will be informative when they are looking through their inventory window later.